4 Important Things to Do Following R U OK Day

Following up from R U OK Day, Hub Australia is working to keep the conversation going, supporting employers, businesses, and teams to look after their own and each other’s well-being in their day-to-day life.

Many people across Australia took the day as an opportunity to check in with their friends and colleagues, but there are some steps to take to make sure you keep the conversation going.

Read more: How to ask R U OK?

1. Make R U OK Day a movement!

R U OK Day is intended to be more than a single day for people check in with each other.

Take the day as a conversation starter, and make a commitment to not only look after your own health but also identify yourself as a potential support system for people in your team (if you have the capability).

Being open about mental health and its long-term maintenance and effects is a great step towards changing the culture we live in, and help create one that is more supportive and accepting of people who may be struggling.

2. Know what tangible support you can offer

As a business owner, manager, or team leader, offering access and resources to help people self-assist can be a productive outcome for your team.

With supportive initiatives already available such as employee assistance programs and Australia’s access to mental health care programs, R U OK Day is a reminder to your team and organisation that your business acknowledges the priority of mental health, and knows that balance and support are necessary for any business to run.

Follow up with your team regularly and make sure it’s reinforced as a company priority, not just a day.

3. Check in with yourself

As they say on planes – you can only help others once you’ve looked after yourself.

Allow yourself a solid amount of time to evaluate your own mental health, priorities and goals.

Brainstorm ways that you can help improve them, whether it’s by taking up more opportunities to be part of a community, ensuring that you have a solid work-life balance, or committing to see your GP to get a mental health plan referral.

4. People might say ‘no’.

Although R U OK Day operates as an amazing campaign and reminder for everyone to take notice of their own and others’ mental wellbeing, it’s important to know the question is part of a larger conversation.

This is built on your existing relationship with the person you ask, and you need to be prepared for what to do if the person opens up and says ‘no’.

The ability to feel vulnerable in front of someone is important, and it needs to be a two-way street for open communication. Work towards creating open and positive relationships with your wider team so conversations can be had naturally and comfortably.


At Hub Australia, we are joining the movement to remove negative stigma from mental health. With regular member events targeted towards building active business communities and connections, growing your network is simple in a thriving coworking space.

Find out more about our member events here

Hub Australia

Hub Australia has a national community of over 3000 members, bringing them together each day to work, network, and motivate each other. With members ranging from solo freelancers to large-scale teams,